All posts by Adrienne Montgomerie

Adrienne is an editing instructor and certified copyeditor with 20+ years experience editing technical materials that inform and educate. She created the Right Angels and Polo Bears podcast in 2013 and has published books on science, editing, and freelancing.

Q&A: Spellcheck Is Now in “Editor” in Word

QWhere did Spellcheck go!?

AIt’s tucked inside “Editor” now. It’s pretty much the same, except for not showing the readability statistics. See the demos below.

Editor is now where spellcheck is found. There’s a button on the right end of the Home ribbon (shown above) as well as on the Review ribbon, at the far left (shown below). The video demos below show how it works on Mac and Windows (video two).
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is review-ribbon-win2020-1024x105.jpg

Quick-start info for running a full Spellcheck

  1. Click the Editor button on the ribbon
  2. Click the Spelling bar on the pane that opens on the right

The “Editing Score” is a value Word came up with based on some calculation of the number of perceived grammar and spelling errors as well as the word count.

Demos of Spellcheck in Word for Mac & Windows

🍏 Spellcheck in the “Editor” on a Mac

🖼 Spellcheck in the “Editor” on Windows

https://youtu.be/qpNhUISTy8k

Troubleshooting

Readability statistics don’t automatically display once the spellcheck is done. Check these apps and websites that assess readability instead.

cover of editing in word 2016 2nd edition
Learn more about Spellcheck starting on page 27 of the self-study book.

It’s harder to get at the customizations to import a special dictionary or exclude words. Refer to the Spellcheck section in the self-study workbook starting on page 32 for further instructions.

I’ve tried the “check for similarity to online sources” but always stalled out with no results.



Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the new Q&A thread.


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© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Essentials training

Get the know-how to hit the editorial desk at full speed. Sign up now for this on-demand self-paced training at Archer Editorial Training and turn Word into something that makes editing easier.

  • Start any time.
  • Learn at your own speed.
  • The course is yours to keep!

Learn how editors maximize Word’s features and tools through demos and exercises specifically addressing editing tasks.

Introductory pricing: $100



Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the new Q&A thread.


Never miss a Word-Wrangling Wednesday tip. Sign up here to get them by email.

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

By practicing one tip each week, you can invest 13 hours this year into professional development. To search the blog, use the orange bar right above this.


© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Word Essentials handout, Editors transform

Here is the handout (296 kB) with a summary of links for more about the topics covered in the session. You can search this blog using the field in the middle of this page, and submit your questions about word using this email link.

For a more detailed exploration of these essentials, sign up for the self-paced, interactive course at Archer Editorial Training. There you’ll also find courses on proofreading, PDF markup, and more!



Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the new Q&A thread.


Never miss a Word-Wrangling Wednesday tip. Sign up here to get them by email.

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

By practicing one tip each week, you can invest 13 hours this year into professional development. To search the blog, use the orange bar right above this.


© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Changes Coming to Comments in Word

“Modern Comments” are rolling out to subscribed Windows users and Word for Web rather like a steam roller over rubber duckies. This new MS Word “feature” is interrupting workflow for many and may render some functions inside them inoperable (such as autocomplete and search). Here’s what to expect:

Continue reading Changes Coming to Comments in Word

Little-known Word Shortcuts

book cover cropped to banner size
Learn more about shortcuts and productivity boosters throughout the self-study book.

If you are using control + S to save like you’ve got a twitch (and what MS user hasn’t learned to save obsessively), you already know that shortcuts will save you a lot of time over using menus. Here are some surprising, lesser-known keyboard shortcuts that will speed up your productivity.

Continue reading Little-known Word Shortcuts

When to Use Vertical Lists

Vertical lists are a useful structure in plain language principles for document architecture, because they aid reading. But they also provide visual prominence to the content, and sometimes that’s not warranted or desired. So, when should you use a vertical list and when should you not? Even within the guidelines we find below, there is room for personal preference, house style, and conventions of the medium. For example, recipes will always place ingredients in a vertical list.

Continue reading When to Use Vertical Lists