Tag Archives: Find & Replace

Delete All Images from a Word Document

Mac users click the down arrow beside the Find field in the Find and Replace pane to select the Graphics option. (Do not select the gear icon.)

Images can be integral content in a manuscript: graphs convey huge volumes of data and information about their relationships; flowcharts relay sequences and relationships; pictures convey context and describe scenes. Images need to be seen while developing a manuscript or reviewing one, because they are so important. But images can also make files enormous to the point of crashing Word or email. Rather than deleting images one by one so that you can work with the file, delete them all at once with this simple Find and Replace in the Find/Navigation panel:

  1. In the Find field, select Graphic from the drop-down menu. Or, type the special code/regular expression ^g in directly.
  2. In the Replace with field, type nothing at all.
  3. Click Replace All.

You’re done! Now your file contains no images or graphs!

Windows users click the down arrow beside the Search document field in the Navigation pane to select the Graphics option.

Insert Placeholders in That Click, Too

Instead of replacing images and graphs with nothing, you may want to write [image placed here] in the Replace field. These replacement words won’t say which image or graph appeared there in the manuscript, but it will alert you that one was present!

Troubleshooting

book cover cropped to banner size
Find out more tricks for working with Find and Replace starting on p. 45 of the book.

Save a backup of the original file.

Tables, shapes, and equations created in Word will remain in place. They are not treated as a graphic. “Smart Art” elements created in Word will be erased.

While working with embedded images can be helpful during the development process, the images in that docx are not likely to be good enough resolution for the designer to work with. Make sure you have a folder full of original images at high resolution (note that means at least 300 dpi for print and about 120 dpi for modern hi-res screens).



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© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Find and Replace, Not Search and Destroy

Prevent Find and Replace from turning into “search and destroy” by using the Whole Word Only, option (“Find whole words only,” for Windows users). This feature helps you replace only whole words, and not matching fragments within other words.

Like a refined Find and Replace, the red-billed oxpecker picks parasites off an impala without hurting the host.

By simply selecting Whole Word Only, the software will identify only “man” and not “human“, for example. This helps to avoid replacement errors such as “inclient services” when attempting to replace instances of “patient.”

Mac users can click the gear icon in the F&R pane to access this option.
Windows users should look for the “Find whole words only” option (greyed out here because wildcards are in use) within Advanced Find and Replace.

Troubleshooting

This option is not available in the simple Find field at top right of the Word window (a feature now for Mac users only). It is accessible only from the Search/F&R panel (for Mac users) or within Advanced Find and Replace (for both Windows and Mac users).

This option isn’t compatible with wildcards.

book cover cropped to banner size
Find out more about Find and Replace, starting on page 49 of the 2nd edition of the book.


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Photo of impala and oxpecker by Bernard Dupont, used under CC BY-SA 2.0.

Wildcards Are Nitro for Your Find & Replace

You know how to search for exact words and phrases. Add wildcards to your terms and you’ll give Find and Replace a nitro boost!

What Wildcards Are

Wildcards are sort of tiny code that can stand in for a category of characters, letting you search for more than exact matches. You may have already use the wildcard in an online search: the asterisk (*) can be used to say “any character”. That makes a search for Adri*nne show results for Adrianne as well as Adrienne and even Adrionne or any other character where the * is, for example. Wildcards can also be used to create a search for a range, such as values between the numbers one and seven: [1-7].

Expand the Advanced Find and Replace dialog to access the wildcards option.

How to Use Wildcards

In Word, expand the Advanced Find and Replace dialogue box and then select the Use Wildcards option (see figure).

For a summary of some of the wildcards most useful when copyediting, look at the table on page 50 of the book. One of the more advanced uses is to break content into “expressions” that can then be rearranged.

Troubleshooting

Turn off Track Changes before doing a Find and Replace using wildcards to avoid messy errors.

book cover cropped to banner size
For more tips on working with Find and Replace, start on p. 47 of the book.


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© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Image by Onur Ömer Yavuz from Pixabay.

Regular Expressions Will Turbo Boost Your Find & Replace

Find and Replace is both an essential tool in the editor’s toolbox and the source of ruination. (Into every editor’s life, a hilariously bad Replace All will fall.) You can use “regular expressions” to turbo boost your F&R!

No need to learn the special codes for regular expressions: use this list.

The simplest way to think of “regular expressions” (regex) is as that list of options for types of content we find in that the drop-down menu in the Find field (see figure). The list gives you an easy selection of regex special codes, using descriptors. Click on one of those and the code for the regex appears in the field—^p for Paragraph Mark, for example.

These regex are particularly useful for finding section breaks, footnote markers, and graphics that have jumped out of sight. They also remedy multiple paragraph breaks used for spacing.

These special codes are available for use in the Replace field as well. The one I find most useful there, however, is not one of the options in the list. It’s ^&, which means, essentially, “what’s in the Find field.” Using ^& in the Replace field saves me from retyping (or mistyping) the entire search criteria just to change formatting (e.g., to apply or remove highlighting), among other uses.

Troubleshooting

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This tip comes from page 46 of the book. Find more on Find and Replace starting on page 45.

Regex sometimes malfunction when Use Wildcards is selected. Learn more about that in the book.

Regex are not wildcards. Next week, we’ll look at some wildcards and how they can add nitro to this turbo boost.



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© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Magnifying glass image by Peggy und Marco Lachmann-Anke from Pixabay.