Tag Archives: productivity

Insert Ribbon Review: Pages Group

a map "locator pin" styled as the MS Word logo
For extensive detailed instructions on using breaks in a document, see Sections 9 & 43 of the book or sign up for the Essentials course!

The Pages group* on the Insert ribbon is where to turn to instead of repeatedly hitting enter to start a new page. And it does more! Below you’ll find a roundup of posts explaining the best practices for using breaks specifically in an editorial production workflow. These posts build on top of the explanations and guides found in the multimedia guide to Editing In Word 365.

Continue reading Insert Ribbon Review: Pages Group

Home Ribbon Review: Paragraph Group

a map "locator pin" styled as the MS Word logo
For more detailed instructions on using the buttons in the Clipboard group, see Sections 9, 20 & 26 of the book, or sign up for the Essentials course!

Rounding up posts on the third grouping on the Home ribbon includes one of the most powerful tools: the pilcrow button. Below you’ll find a roundup of posts relating to this grouping in Word’s ribbon, explaining the best practices of using those tools specifically in an editorial production workflow. These posts build on top of the explanations and guides found in the multimedia guide to Editing In Word 365.

Continue reading Home Ribbon Review: Paragraph Group

Home Ribbon Review: Font Group

a map "locator pin" styled as the MS Word logo
For more detailed instructions on using the buttons in the Font group, see Sections 10, 36, 37 & 41 of the book, or sign up for the Essentials course!

Moving to the second grouping on the Home ribbon, we continue our roundup of posts relating to each part of Word’s ribbons, explaining the best practices of using them specifically in an editorial production workflow. These posts build on top of the explanations and guides found in the multimedia guide to Editing In Word 365.

Continue reading Home Ribbon Review: Font Group

Home Ribbon Review: Clipboard Group

a map "locator pin" styled as the MS Word logo
For more detailed instructions on using the buttons in the Clipboard group, see Sections 7, 9, and 11 of the book, or sign up for the Essentials course!

Here we begin our roundup of posts relating to each part of Word’s ribbons, explaining the best practices of using them in specifically in an editorial production workflow. These posts build on top of the explanations and guides found in the multimedia guide to Editing in Word 365.

Continue reading Home Ribbon Review: Clipboard Group

Brain Hacks for Editing Work That’s Too-Familiar

Whether it’s your own writing, the nth look-through, or you’re doing all of the editing stages on a file, there comes a time when your eyes just can’t see what’s actually on the page anymore. Your brain compensates and autocorrects; that is NOT what we’re hoping for! Refresh your eyes and see what’s actually on the page by using these “brain hacks” that “special education” teachers shared with me. The audio below explains how and why these hacks work:

Continue reading Brain Hacks for Editing Work That’s Too-Familiar

Using ChatGPT to Write Wildcard Searches

a map "locator pin" styled as the MS Word logo
To learn more about using wildcards, check out Section 10.2 of Editing in Word 365.

Over on the Right Angels and Polo Bears blog, I’ve been testing the hot new AI out for editing. While it’s true that generative pretrained translators (GPTs) are advancing so fast that my post may be out of date by the time I edit it, the verdict remains that AI isn’t ready to take over copyediting jobs. In this post I find it can’t even write a useful Find & Replace sequence using wildcards. I’m sad about that, because writing those can be a brain twister!

Continue reading Using ChatGPT to Write Wildcard Searches

Learn to Make the Most of Word

Do you even know what you don’t know? I didn’t!

I spent years, stumbling onto functions and tools in Word, then searching for hours to find out how to use them; skipping through long videos to find the 2 minutes that answered my question; wrapping my head around how what they said might apply to the publishing tasks and workflow.

There is an easier way!

That’s why I wrote Editing in Word. It might look like a book, but it’s really a self-study multimedia course tailored precisely to how editors can use Word to make it less painful and make their editing more effective and efficient.

And now there are two courses for editors with open start times. Learn what you want, when you need it, on your schedule and at your own pace:

cover of Essentials: Editing in Word 365

These materials cut right to the chase, and show how these tools are used in the editing workflow for best practices in a publishing environment.

You don’t need Word 365 to follow these materials. There’s little variety across the versions of Word.

Both Mac and Windows instructions are provided in the lessons and in the video demos.



Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the Q&A thread.



Learn with us! Join a course today.

© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Q&A: Tracked Changes are hard to look at. Can’t we use something else?

QI find it hard to look at tracked changes; can editors use another method?

AIt’s an interesting question, and one that gives me feels, it seems. TL;DR — No! Don’t make other professionals put up with awkward kludges to assuage some initial discomfort. You get used to it, and let me share some better ways to ease the pain.

Why Publishing Pros Use Track Changes

Continue reading Q&A: Tracked Changes are hard to look at. Can’t we use something else?