Tag Archives: publishing

Next Edition Coming Soon!

book cover of eiw365
Find a faster way through Word

Now double the size, this expanded and updated edition incorporates an entire booklet on working with tables and three sections on ways to customize your workspace and combine and manipulate the features to hack the tools for maximum effect. Plus, it covers all of Word’s updates including changes to Modern Comments, Track Changes, Spellcheck, and the new Editor toolset.

Watch this space for the release!

Peek at the table of contents:

Click image to enlarge it


Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the Q&A thread.



© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Q&A: Spellcheck Is Now in “Editor” in Word

QWhere did Spellcheck go!?

AIt’s tucked inside “Editor” now. It’s pretty much the same, except that readability statistics are found in an area of the Editor pane too, not after running Spellcheck. See the demos below.

Editor is now where spellcheck is found. There’s a button on the right end of the Home ribbon (shown above) as well as on the Review ribbon, at the far left (shown below). The video demos below show how it works on Mac and Windows (video two).
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is review-ribbon-win2020-1024x105.jpg

Quick-start info for running a full Spellcheck

  1. Click the Editor button on the ribbon
  2. Click the Spelling bar on the pane that opens on the right

The “Editing Score” is a value Word came up with based on some calculation of the number of perceived grammar and spelling errors as well as the word count.

Demos of Spellcheck in Word for Mac & Windows

🍏 Spellcheck in the “Editor” on a Mac

🖼 Spellcheck in the “Editor” on Windows

Troubleshooting

Readability statistics don’t automatically display once the spellcheck is done. Click on the Document Stats to see Word’s Flesch-Kincaid assessment.

book cover of eiw365
Learn more about Spellcheck in Section 8 of the self-study book.

It’s harder to get at the customizations to import a special dictionary or exclude words. Refer to the Spellcheck section in the self-study workbook starting on page 32 for further instructions.

I’ve tried the “check for similarity to online sources” but always stalled out with no results.



Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the Q&A thread.



© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Essentials training

Get the know-how to hit the editorial desk at full speed. Sign up now for this on-demand self-paced training at Archer Editorial Training and turn Word into something that makes editing easier.

  • Start any time.
  • Learn at your own speed.
  • The course is yours to keep!

Learn how editors maximize Word’s features and tools through demos and exercises specifically addressing editing tasks.

Introductory pricing: $100



Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the Q&A thread.



© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Word Essentials handout, Editors transform

Here is the handout (296 kB) with a summary of links for more about the topics covered in the session. You can search this blog using the field in the middle of this page, and submit your questions about word using this email link.

For a more detailed exploration of these essentials, sign up for the self-paced, interactive course at Archer Editorial Training. There you’ll also find courses on proofreading, PDF markup, and more!



Got a gnarly Word problem? Submit your problem and we’ll try to answer it in the Q&A thread.



© This blog and all materials in it are copyright Adrienne Montgomerie on the date of publication. All rights reserved. No portion may be stored or distributed without express written permission. Asking is easy!

Paste Options in Word 365

Not nearly as flavourful as that paste we ate in preschool, but maybe more useful, Word has several options for you to paste content with. Get at the the options from the ribbon. Just click the little down arrow beside the Paste button on the left end of the Home ribbon to see the options.

Here’s how they’re useful:

Continue reading Paste Options in Word 365

Quick Trick to Remove Hyperlinks

They got rid of Clippy but not many of the other annoying automated features in MS Word. Automatic formatting is something that most editors want to turn off before they work. In fact, this is why turning off most automation is covered in the “Get Ready to Edit” section of the book.

When you get a document in which all of the URLs (web addresses) are blue and underlined, and active (hyperlinked), you’ll most likely want to remove them so they don’t cause design problems or (horrors!) end up in print. You can do this one at a time, or in one fell swoop (globally).

Continue reading Quick Trick to Remove Hyperlinks

What to Do With an Edited Word File

Your manuscript just came back from the copyeditor or proofreader. Now what?

Mock Shock
After you freak out over all the mark-up, tell yourself this is typical for professional writing, take a breath, and roll up your sleeves.

It’s time to check the changes the editor made, answer their questions, and clear up any remaining issues. The file will probably go back to the editor for some final clean up. If it doesn’t, you have to clear ALL markup to make it ready for the printer/ production department.

There may be a lot of work left. This is typical and does not mean the writing is terrible. Even if an editor wrote it, she could expect as many edits on her work; writing is like that. Addressing edits takes an average of 1 hr per 2500 words, so settle yourself in and let’s go.

Short Version| Long Version

Continue reading What to Do With an Edited Word File